Aeropress Brewing Guide

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Pact Coffee AeropressA relative newbie to the scene, the Aeropress was invented in 2005 by Aerobie. That’s right, the same folks that make the superlative frisbees.

In a nutshell this bad-boy works by forcing steeped coffee through a filter.

But when it comes to proper brewing guides, who needs a nutshell? Especially when there are endless different techniques for using an Aeropress. In fact, there are so many different methods that it can be pretty intimidating for an Aeropress newbie.

Below we’ve opted to cover the inverted method. This comes down to preference but we’ve gone for one version of the Inverted Brewing Method, as it helps you to avoid the dreaded drip and encourages an even flavour. It’s important to note we’ve gone for proportions that require diluting after it’s brewed…

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Picture courtesy of DCILY, LLC, on Society Six

Here’s how it’s done:

  1. Pull out the plunger until the rubber seal is touching the number 4 and flip the Aeropress upside down (hence the ‘inverted’)
  2. Spoon in one heaped tablespoon of medium/fine coffee, this will be 12-14g but your Aeropress should come with a scoop that’ll do the job
  3. Boil the kettle and leave it to cool for around 1 minute before filling the Aeropress to the number 2, this will be about 100ml
  4. Stir the grounds, making sure no dry spots are visible
  5. Attach the filter and paper and push down slightly until you see bubbles coming off the top of the cap and leave to brew for around a minute
  6. Invert the Aeropress over the coffee and begin plunging!
  7. Stop when you hear a hissing noise
  8. Dilute the coffee to taste with hot water – though 50/50 are our preferred proportions this makes a pretty strong coffee, so don’t forget to dilute to suit your palate

Good news! The Aeropress is super-easy to clean out, just pop the cap off, plunge the coffee puck into the bin and rinse!

Top tips:

  • Rinse out your filter paper with hot water before you begin. That should remove that papery taste you can sometimes get and also help to secure it in the filter cap
  • Experiment with brewing times and different water/coffee ratios to mix up your coffee drinking experience
  • Use freshly filtered tap water for a silky-soft and uber-smooth drinking experience

52 thoughts on “Aeropress Brewing Guide

  1. Why stop at the hissing? One of the things I like about the AeroPress is the coffee+filter is compressed into a nice tight puck which I can just pop out into the bin. Doesn’t seem like that would happen with this. Just wondering what the specific benefit of stopping early is.

    1. Hi Dave,

      Thanks for getting in touch. We suggest that you stop as you hear the ‘hiss’ as pressing further causes over-extraction of the coffee. What I tend to do with my AeroPress is to stop at the hiss, take it off my mug and place it in the sink. Once here, I then press the AeroPress down all the way (which creates the puck) that I can then dispose of into the bin/composter.

      I hope this helps!

      Callum

  2. May be a stupid question, but I didn’t quite understand this step:

    Attach the filter and paper and push down slightly until you see bubbles coming off the top of the cap and leave to brew for around a minute

    Are we meant to be essentially invert plunging until the liquid starts to seep through the filter?

    1. Hi Jordan,

      Thank you for the comment and apologies if you felt that this step was unclear. Yes, in the inverted state push down on the AeroPress just slightly (not until the coffee itself starts seeping out) just half a centimetre or so.

      Callum

      1. I think what was unclear to me was that presumably you only get the bubbles if the filter is wet but you don’t mention rinsing the filter until later.

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  5. Thanks for this – but quick question – when it comes to strength, do all coffees warrant the same one scoop when it comes to aeropress? I know you say experiment but when you only have one bag of precious coffee is there a shorthand way to work out if a new coffee is best stronger/weaker – I’m an Americano drinker if that helps any

    1. It’s not so much about the amount of coffee that you use but rather the time that you brew for. If you drink Americano usually, I’d suggest that you leave your coffee to brew for slightly longer as espresso based Americano are traditionally stronger than the coffee that will be produced following the timings above.

      I hope this helps!

  6. Thanks for the instructions. I don’t suppose you have a video of this method in action? I find viewing is a bit easier to understand than instructions.

        1. Perfect. Thank you. Just a thought. You should start doing your own videos on these methods. It would be a great addition to the site/blog.

  7. Hi Tim, we usually find that a minute is long enough to make a great tasting coffee. Of course it does also come down to the type of kettle you use to boil the water and how quickly this will cool. The above is just a guide and it’s always best to tweak it until you have found the perfect method for you. Happy brewing!

    PS We have a new Aeropress brewing guide which can be found [here](http://blog.pactcoffee.com/2015/09/25/the-best-aeropress-coffee-youll-ever-make)

  8. My technique is slightly different. I invert the aeropress with plunger pulled close to the end, and add a little water (just enough to cover the plunger) and then add coffee. (I grind toward the fine side, after having experimented to find a decent push pressure) I then add just enough water for the grounds to saturate (approximating a poor man’s pourover) and I leave for 2-4 minutes. (Depending on the coffee) I then add the remaining water, stir, cover, flip, and press.

    The coffee comes out strong, but with a clear taste profile, which accentuates the uniqueness of varietals.

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